Civil Rights

Civil Rights Movement in South Carolina

  • The NAACP in South Carolina
    The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People is a significant national grassroots-based civil rights organization in the United States. The first NAACP chapters in South Carolina were organized in Columbia and Charleston in 1917 with seventy-five members.
  • Ku Klux Klan Broadside, South Carolina, 1957
    This broadside advertises a Ku Klux Klan Rally in Swansea, SC in 1957.
  • The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow
    Read stories of people and personal narratives, explore the interactive maps, and learn about the struggles of African Americans against government-sanctioned segregation.
  • Civil Rights in America: Racial Voting Rights pdf
    Learn more about the fight for equal voting rights in the United States, including information about important properties and landmarks.
  • Martin Luther King speaks in Kingstree, SC May 9, 1966
    Watch a video of Martin Luther King , Jr. in Kingstree speaking on voting.
  • The Charleston Hospital Workers Movement, 1968-1969
    Explore this online exhibition about the development and aftermath of the Charleston Hospital Workers' Strike that took place in Charleston from March to July 1969.
  • The Friendship 9
    Students in Rock Hill went to jail after staging a sit-in at a segregated McCrory's lunch counter in 1961.  
  • Isaac Woodard
    Isaac Woodwad was an African American World War II veteran who was beaten and blinded in Batesburg, SC hours after his discharged from the Army. View court transcripts, military documentation, and assorted primary documents related to this historic case.


Orangeburg Massacre

Demonstrations on Gervais StreetDemonstrations on Gervais Street in Columbia protesting the Orangeburg Massacre, 3/13/1968. Image courtesy of Bill Barley Photography and the Orangeburg Massacre 1968 website.

On the night of February 8th, 1968, three students were killed by police gunfire on the South Carolina State University campus in Orangeburg. Find out more about this incident that became known as the Orangeburg Massacre.

Documents and Video

People

School Integration

Judge J. Waties Waring

Judge Waring was the dissenting opinion in the Briggs v. Elliott court case; a white Southerner who advocated for justice and an end to segregation in the education system. He and his family were ostracized by the white society of Charleston and he eventually moved to New York City.