All Lesson Plans

Adaptations to the Environment: A Living Fossil – the American Horseshoe Crab

Students will learn the anatomy and natural history of the horseshoe crab, recognize and explain adaptations used by horseshoe crabs to interact successfully with their environments, and investigate the evolutionary history of the horseshoe crab. They will also examine ecological issues concerning the horseshoe crab and its harvest for medicinal uses.

Adaptations to the Environment: A Living Fossil – the American Horseshoe Crab

Students will learn the anatomy and natural history of the horseshoe crab, recognize and explain adaptations used by horseshoe crabs to interact successfully with their environments, and investigate the evolutionary history of the horseshoe crab. They will also examine ecological issues concerning the horseshoe crab and its harvest for medicinal uses.

Analyze Patterns and Distribution of Gold Mines

Students will be able to recognize and describe patterns of rock distribution in the state.

Aquatic Insects found in Mountain Streams and their Adaptations

Students will recognize, characterize, and describe three microhabitats of a mountain stream: riffle, run, and pool. They will also identify the abiotic factors that might affect the insects that live in different habitats within the stream and in what way, and then discuss morphological adaptations that insects would need in order to prosper in that habitat. The students will then go out into the field, identify the microhabitats, and collect insects from those areas. The students will take the insects back to the lab, examine the insects under a microscope, identify them in order, and observe the adaptations they see in the insects they collected. They will then graphically represent their findings and write a paragraph explaining their graphs.

Attack of the Hunley

Students, who are already familiar with the overall story of the H.L. Hunley, will use class discussion to arrive at a deeper understanding of the hardships and dangers faced by the crew, and especially the effects of weather factors on the little submarine’s mission.

Note: Lesson starts on page 59.

Before, During, and After the Holocaust

Students will be pre-assessed of their knowledge on World War II. The teacher will explain genocide, and students will construct a research paper based on a specific genocide using the information they find on their own in the computer lab and library. Then the teacher will explain the Holocaust Genocide. There will be supplementary resources such as audio conversations, video documentary, and a collection of poetry.

Beneath these Waters

Charleston Harbor was a major target of the Union blockade. The Southerners tried to slip through the blockade squadrons by using ships known as blockade-runners. Students will locate the wreck sites of both Union and Confederate vessels that came to rest in the Charleston Harbor during the Civil War.

Between the Waters – Analyzing Historical Photographs Activity

There are hundreds of historical photographs pertaining to Hobcaw Barony and the Baruch family, most of which are archived at the Georgetown County Digital Library (http://www.gcdigital.org/). Many of these photographs can also be found throughout the Between the Waters website. They provide a rich visual record of life at Hobcaw during the first half of the 20th century, and an opportunity for students to increase their literacy skills. Photographs contain a great deal of information but they can also contain misinformation. In this lesson students learn how to analyze or “read” a photograph, an important aspect of visual literacy.

Bivalve Biology

Students will learn: 1) both inside and outside structures of a bivalve; and 2) how these structures help each animal live in a different habitat.

Black Americans in Congress Speak Their Mind

This activity is designed to accompany Black Americans in Congress, 1870–2007.  Students have the opportunity to analyze a series of statements made by Black Americans who served in Congress. Students are encouraged to think about the role that quotations can play in the study of history.

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