All Lesson Plans

Introduction to Adult Insects and Their Adaptations

Students will be introduced to organisms found in Class Insecta and the different adaptations these organisms have developed over time to survive and prosper in their respective habitats. They will also learn the origin of the names of several orders within Class Insecta and be able to identify the key physical characteristics that separate one order from another. The students will then split into two teams, observe and then collect insects from different habitats, and identify the insects in order using a dichotomous key (provided). Finally, the students will make frequency histograms showing the make-up of insects they found in each of the habitats the teams sampled. The students will discuss the difference in insect make-up in the different habitats sampled by all the teams and any insect adaptations they may have observed.

Introduction to the Cherokee Language

Students will be able to pronounce Cherokee letters and words and read simple sentences.

It’s all Wrapped Up!

This lesson examines the packaging, specifically the overpackaging, of commonly used food products and encourages students to ask the tough questions and propose solutions for this environmental problem.

Jim Crow and the Exclusion of African Americans from Congress, 1887 – 1929

This activity is designed to accompany the contextual essay, “‘The Negroes’ Temporary Farewell’: Jim Crow and the Exclusion of African Americans from Congress, 1877–1929,” from Black Americans in Congress, 1870–2007. Students have the opportunity to learn more about the Black Americans who served in Congress from 1887 to 1929. Students are encouraged to analyze the role African-American Representatives played in Congress during this era, as well as the ways in which they may have changed the institution.

John Lawson’s Emigration Impact

The student will review writings by John Lawson and comments about Lawson’s writings to see how the writings might have affected emigration to America. After reviewing Lawson’s writings and comments about them, students will answer several questions. Students will analyze the influence of John Lawson in the early settlement of the American colonies. After reviewing Lawson’s writings and comments about them, students will write an essay expressing their thoughts on whether Lawson played a part in persuading others to settle in America. 

Keeping the Faith: African Americans Return to Congress, 1929-1970

This activity is designed to accompany the contextual essay, “Keeping the Faith: African Americans Return to Congress, 1929–1970,” from Black Americans in Congress, 1870–2007. Students have the opportunity to learn more about the Black Americans who served in Congress from 1929 to 1970. Students are encouraged to analyze the role African-American Representatives and Senators played in Congress during this era, as well as the ways in which they may have changed the institution.

Lawson’s Many Roles

This lesson provides a look at the life of John Lawson in his various roles as explorer, surveyor, writer, land speculator, and trader. The student will determine the relative area in which John Lawson traveled and lived. The student will write an informational essay tracing the movement of John Lawson and summarizing his contacts in North Carolina/South Carolina. The student will assess the impact on and contributions of John Lawson to the local and surrounding area.

Lesson Plan for A.P. Language Students

The notes in the schedule are for introducing the memoir Night and fallacies of argument pertaining to The Holocaust and the state of Israel. A Synthesis essay will conclude the unit whereby students will culminate all of their learned background information and respond in a collegiate fashion to a given prompt.

Lesson Plan for Teaching the Holocaust and Genocide

The purpose of this lesson is to present 10th-grade students with an overview of the historical event known as the Holocaust by examining how it began, how it progressed, who it targeted, and what led to its conclusion. In addition to this, the unit is designed to touch upon similar occurrences, past and present, ranging from the Armenian Genocide to present day events in Darfur. The lesson is designed to address South Carolina state standards for Global Studies, i.e. World History.

Lesson Plans by Stone and Mullis—Year-Long Thematic Unit

To respect the differences of others and show the students that their choices have consequences is a recurring theme. This theme is going to be studied throughout the year in a variety of genres. Another recurring theme throughout the year is to emphasize the importance of taking action and getting involved in the community. The activities in this unit can be interchanged throughout the school year at the teacher’s discretion. Only the Holocaust lessons have been outlined in this unit and are meant to be used as a supplement. Many moral issues will take place during this study as well, and the students will develop their own senses of character through class discussion, activities, projects, and readings.

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